The Secondary Benefits of Social Media Advertising

April 19, 2018 | 2 min read
By Geena Nazareth

As highly engaged social media users grow in number and mobile continues to dominate, social media advertising has become an obvious choice for many businesses in the modern world.  From Facebook and Instagram to LinkedIn and Twitter, there are many social media advertising platforms to choose from that offer granular targeting options allowing you to reach your ideal customer and achieve your marketing goals.  Aside from the success you can attain directly from your social media campaigns, you may also see additional, unexpected benefits.  Read on to learn how social media advertising can produce results from other online sources.

How?

Secondary performance boosts can occur when, for example, a user sees an ad on LinkedIn and doesn’t click or convert (or does and decides to return to the website), but later searches the company’s brand name on Google and clicks on an ad (paid search) or natural listing (organic), or just types the company’s URL into their browser and goes directly to the site (direct).  Ultimately, more traffic is being driven to your website as a result of your highly targeted social media campaigns’ reach.

Example:

Marketing Mojo launched several targeted LinkedIn and Facebook campaigns based on developed buyer personas for a client.  While the campaigns themselves did generate the desired results, what is even more noteworthy is how the campaigns contributed to performance improvements for other online traffic sources (organic, direct and paid search) while they were active.

When comparing the period immediately preceding the social media advertising to the period when the campaigns were active, we saw overall traffic increases from both organic and direct, increasing 24% and 15%, respectively.

Additionally, paid search brand campaign impressions increased 40%.

The audiences we were reaching on LinkedIn and Facebook contained many who had never visited the website before, with new users from organic, direct and the paid search brand campaign increasing 27%, 13% and 24%, respectively.

More importantly, the traffic increases also translated to transaction and revenue increases.

When comparing the previous period and the previous year to the social media advertising period, both organic and direct transactions and revenue experienced improvements as shown in the graphs below.  Organic and direct reported impressive 209% and 324% revenue increases year-over-year.

Users may not always be ready to learn more or make a purchase at the exact moment in which they are served your ad, but that doesn’t mean that they are uninterested or that your campaign is unsuccessful.  In other words, you may grab a user’s attention in one way and gain their interest and business in another.  Social media advertising has value beyond the campaigns themselves – always look outside of your campaign data to measure the full impact.

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The Secondary Benefits of Social Media Advertising

April 19, 2018 | 2 min read
By Geena Nazareth

As highly engaged social media users grow in number and mobile continues to dominate, social media advertising has become an obvious choice for many businesses in the modern world.  From Facebook and Instagram to LinkedIn and Twitter, there are many social media advertising platforms to choose from that offer granular targeting options allowing you to reach your ideal customer and achieve your marketing goals.  Aside from the success you can attain directly from your social media campaigns, you may also see additional, unexpected benefits.  Read on to learn how social media advertising can produce results from other online sources.

How?

Secondary performance boosts can occur when, for example, a user sees an ad on LinkedIn and doesn’t click or convert (or does and decides to return to the website), but later searches the company’s brand name on Google and clicks on an ad (paid search) or natural listing (organic), or just types the company’s URL into their browser and goes directly to the site (direct).  Ultimately, more traffic is being driven to your website as a result of your highly targeted social media campaigns’ reach.

Example:

Marketing Mojo launched several targeted LinkedIn and Facebook campaigns based on developed buyer personas for a client.  While the campaigns themselves did generate the desired results, what is even more noteworthy is how the campaigns contributed to performance improvements for other online traffic sources (organic, direct and paid search) while they were active.

When comparing the period immediately preceding the social media advertising to the period when the campaigns were active, we saw overall traffic increases from both organic and direct, increasing 24% and 15%, respectively.

Additionally, paid search brand campaign impressions increased 40%.

The audiences we were reaching on LinkedIn and Facebook contained many who had never visited the website before, with new users from organic, direct and the paid search brand campaign increasing 27%, 13% and 24%, respectively.

More importantly, the traffic increases also translated to transaction and revenue increases.

When comparing the previous period and the previous year to the social media advertising period, both organic and direct transactions and revenue experienced improvements as shown in the graphs below.  Organic and direct reported impressive 209% and 324% revenue increases year-over-year.

Users may not always be ready to learn more or make a purchase at the exact moment in which they are served your ad, but that doesn’t mean that they are uninterested or that your campaign is unsuccessful.  In other words, you may grab a user’s attention in one way and gain their interest and business in another.  Social media advertising has value beyond the campaigns themselves – always look outside of your campaign data to measure the full impact.

Share This Post
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