Top Ten Link Building Strategies
June 28, 2008 | 4 min read
By Catherine Potts

Link building tactics are always a topic of big discussion and always will be. I totally get that. In fact, it’s part of what keeps me employed.

Everyone has an opinion about what works and what doesn’t work. How many posts can we have on effective link building? A billion, that’s how many (that includes mine). It’s actually 48.5 million actually (give or take). It’s all about exposure. How and where that happens is the big question. Here are the main ways you can help a client gain exposure, in no particular order.

.EDU links

These are difficult to come by. Matt Cutts is a big fan and if you can get some original research that will be used by libraries or educational institutions, more power to ya. This type of writing takes a very long time and I’m not sure that we have a client that would go to this lenghth just to get this type of link at this time. They’re concentrating on writing to sell their product (which in turn does make the world a better place) but as far as I know, there isn’t research grade content.

Whitepapers

This is probably the closest thing to the research paper we’re going to get at this time. There are pay sites to submit your whitepaper to and there are free sites. We submit to exclusivly free sites. I’ve seen some companies try and charge upwards of $5,000 to post your whitepaper on their business site. This is a good way to establish your client as an expert in their area and because another company chooses to post the paper, they’re essentially saying that your client is legitimate.

Press Releases

Always good if you can get them out there. It’s easy to go for the tried and true tactics and press releases fall by the wayside I think. It’s content that tells the world that you think your company is great and we all know it’s when others tell the world your company is great that brings the link love.

Editorial and relationship

At this stage of the game, this is the most highly regarded link. It’s someone who digs on your product and wants to share it with others. It’s not a typically coerced link. Most white hatters aren’t going to give someone this type of link love if they don’t really believe in the product or service. Forming a relationship means something to the powers that be because when you have this type of link the appearance is that you’re product is more relevant.

Sponsorship and Niche

In evaluating competitor links, I’ve found that one of the smartest things one of our client’s competitors did was become major sponsors of events and in radio station giveaways. In that situation, the websites for the events or radio stations always provided a link back to our client’s competitor’s website. Getting in on a niche and becoming a sponsor increases both your visibility, trustworthiness and relevancy. This is key.

Article Marketing

We have had pretty good success up until the point that the content is so highly scrutinized by the editors of the article marketing service that we can’t get the article past them to get it submitted to the web. With some clients the content is time sensitive and so we’ve had to bag the article because it’s now outdated content that got stuck in the editorial process.

Blog Posts

As previously stated by Janet Miller, getting a client to the point where they’re doing blog postings with regularity (or even at all) can be difficult. Nevermind the now popular question of ethics (as mentioned in her posting). Good grief! Who is to judge? Can we all stop fighting each other and just get on with producing a fine product for those who pay us? The idea that some blogging companies will take a client’s money to blog but then claim it’s unethical to post that content any other place than the original posting is ridiculous. Where does the exposure come in then? What’s the point of social media if the only person who sees it is the one who created it? OK I’m done ranting on that.

Blogging is a time consuming (if you even have the man/womanpower to do it), yet worthwhile, tactic but takes buy in from all parties in the mix. Getting in the habit of blogging often is best but it can be intimidating.

Forums

At this time, our company has not officially spent any time posting information in forums on our client’s behalf so I can’t provide feedback on it’s worth. SER says it’s good though. Forums are pretty time consuming. It’s possible we could visit this at a later date. I assume this would take permissions from the client to have people post on their behalf.

Widgets!

What value do widgets bring to the link building mix? Well you can have a developer embed a link and this widget, depending on your business could provide some sort of tool customers or those who like your products use. In return you get a link back (which is what you want). One of the possible issues is that some smart little computer users might be able to get in and change some critical part of the widget and you won’t get your link back.

Traditional Directory

This is by far the easiest way to increase links to your client. It requires the least about of effort and you can do it on the cheap. It can be pretty time consuming and should’nt be used as the one and only way you create exposure. Relevancy can be called into question and the link cheapened.

Using a combination of these tactics to establish your client’s presence is the best use of your time. When you spend the time to create trust, it will pay you back in the future. Get out there, get seen. That’s what it’s all about.

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Top Ten Link Building Strategies
June 28, 2008 | 4 min read
By Catherine Potts

Link building tactics are always a topic of big discussion and always will be. I totally get that. In fact, it’s part of what keeps me employed.

Everyone has an opinion about what works and what doesn’t work. How many posts can we have on effective link building? A billion, that’s how many (that includes mine). It’s actually 48.5 million actually (give or take). It’s all about exposure. How and where that happens is the big question. Here are the main ways you can help a client gain exposure, in no particular order.

.EDU links

These are difficult to come by. Matt Cutts is a big fan and if you can get some original research that will be used by libraries or educational institutions, more power to ya. This type of writing takes a very long time and I’m not sure that we have a client that would go to this lenghth just to get this type of link at this time. They’re concentrating on writing to sell their product (which in turn does make the world a better place) but as far as I know, there isn’t research grade content.

Whitepapers

This is probably the closest thing to the research paper we’re going to get at this time. There are pay sites to submit your whitepaper to and there are free sites. We submit to exclusivly free sites. I’ve seen some companies try and charge upwards of $5,000 to post your whitepaper on their business site. This is a good way to establish your client as an expert in their area and because another company chooses to post the paper, they’re essentially saying that your client is legitimate.

Press Releases

Always good if you can get them out there. It’s easy to go for the tried and true tactics and press releases fall by the wayside I think. It’s content that tells the world that you think your company is great and we all know it’s when others tell the world your company is great that brings the link love.

Editorial and relationship

At this stage of the game, this is the most highly regarded link. It’s someone who digs on your product and wants to share it with others. It’s not a typically coerced link. Most white hatters aren’t going to give someone this type of link love if they don’t really believe in the product or service. Forming a relationship means something to the powers that be because when you have this type of link the appearance is that you’re product is more relevant.

Sponsorship and Niche

In evaluating competitor links, I’ve found that one of the smartest things one of our client’s competitors did was become major sponsors of events and in radio station giveaways. In that situation, the websites for the events or radio stations always provided a link back to our client’s competitor’s website. Getting in on a niche and becoming a sponsor increases both your visibility, trustworthiness and relevancy. This is key.

Article Marketing

We have had pretty good success up until the point that the content is so highly scrutinized by the editors of the article marketing service that we can’t get the article past them to get it submitted to the web. With some clients the content is time sensitive and so we’ve had to bag the article because it’s now outdated content that got stuck in the editorial process.

Blog Posts

As previously stated by Janet Miller, getting a client to the point where they’re doing blog postings with regularity (or even at all) can be difficult. Nevermind the now popular question of ethics (as mentioned in her posting). Good grief! Who is to judge? Can we all stop fighting each other and just get on with producing a fine product for those who pay us? The idea that some blogging companies will take a client’s money to blog but then claim it’s unethical to post that content any other place than the original posting is ridiculous. Where does the exposure come in then? What’s the point of social media if the only person who sees it is the one who created it? OK I’m done ranting on that.

Blogging is a time consuming (if you even have the man/womanpower to do it), yet worthwhile, tactic but takes buy in from all parties in the mix. Getting in the habit of blogging often is best but it can be intimidating.

Forums

At this time, our company has not officially spent any time posting information in forums on our client’s behalf so I can’t provide feedback on it’s worth. SER says it’s good though. Forums are pretty time consuming. It’s possible we could visit this at a later date. I assume this would take permissions from the client to have people post on their behalf.

Widgets!

What value do widgets bring to the link building mix? Well you can have a developer embed a link and this widget, depending on your business could provide some sort of tool customers or those who like your products use. In return you get a link back (which is what you want). One of the possible issues is that some smart little computer users might be able to get in and change some critical part of the widget and you won’t get your link back.

Traditional Directory

This is by far the easiest way to increase links to your client. It requires the least about of effort and you can do it on the cheap. It can be pretty time consuming and should’nt be used as the one and only way you create exposure. Relevancy can be called into question and the link cheapened.

Using a combination of these tactics to establish your client’s presence is the best use of your time. When you spend the time to create trust, it will pay you back in the future. Get out there, get seen. That’s what it’s all about.

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